kqedscience:

California Whales Rebound in a Big Way
“The number of California blue whales has returned to near historical levels. The species had been hunted nearly to extinction, researchers say.
“The recovery of California blue whales from whaling demonstrates the ability of blue whale populations to rebuild under careful management and conservation measures,” says Cole Monnahan, a doctoral student in quantitative ecology and resource management at University of Washington and lead author of a new study published in the journal Marine Mammal Science.”
Read more from Futurity.

I love a happy headline!

kqedscience:

California Whales Rebound in a Big Way

The number of California blue whales has returned to near historical levels. The species had been hunted nearly to extinction, researchers say.

“The recovery of California blue whales from whaling demonstrates the ability of blue whale populations to rebuild under careful management and conservation measures,” says Cole Monnahan, a doctoral student in quantitative ecology and resource management at University of Washington and lead author of a new study published in the journal Marine Mammal Science.”

Read more from Futurity.

I love a happy headline!

morethanamomentintime:

charlesoberonn:

If you disrespect women in the tech industry, the angry spirits of Ada Lovelace, the world’s first computer programmer, and Grace Hopper, the creator of the first compiler, will delete all the commenting from someone’s code just before you have to debug it.

http://www.smbc-comics.com/?id=2516#comic

(via scientistsarepeopletoo)

"Just to see women in science respond to Kathryn Janeway the way they did was unbelievably gratifying. I had some small influence over a lot of these women’s decisions about how they were going to approach their future. …and that alone made me feel so privileged. I’m terribly proud of it."

Kate Mulgrew

Talking TV with Ryan and Ryan Podcast September 13, 2013 (X)

(Source: mulgrewsprimedirective, via femscinerd)

(Source: kenmehlman, via prolethean)

What It Means When Women in Tech Are Told They’re ‘Too Abrasive’ (Hint: It’s Got Something To Do With Sexism) 
In a recent study by linguist and startup CEO Kieran Snyder, she examined the kind of feedback men and women receive at tech companies. Snyder asked men and women in the tech industry to send her their performance reviews. She received 248 reviews from 105 men and 75 women. 
This is what she found: men and women receive different kinds of feedback. Women’s personalities were criticized much more frequently in performance reviews than men’s. Men were criticized for job performance, while women were criticized for not just their work output but for being ”abrasive" or having "the wrong tone". The results are so shocking, they seem skewed. 

Men received comments like “There were a few cases where it would have been extremely helpful if you had gone deeper into the details to help move an area forward.”
While women received comments like “Your peers sometimes feel that you don’t leave them enough room. Sometimes you need to step back to let others shine.”

Words like bossy, abrasive, strident, and aggressive are used to describe women’s behaviors when they lead; words like emotional and irrational describe their behaviors when they object. All of these words show up at least twice in the women’s review text I reviewed, some much more often. Abrasive alone is used 17 times to describe 13 different women. Among these words, only aggressive shows up in men’s reviews at all. It shows up three times, twice with an exhortation to be more of it.

This data validates women’s experience in STEM fields. They are stuck between a rock and hard place. Sheryl Sandberg tells them to Lean In, to speak up, and to be aggressive. While their peers and managers tell them to lean back, let others shine, and to be a little quieter. 
This is just one example of how the culture in STEM fields turns women away. While other factors keep the pipeline leaky, company culture plays a huge role. Women should be encourage to speak up, to be leaders. They should not turned down when they act like one.  It seems some tech companies have a long way to go to eliminate gender bias. 
And please ladies, don’t be discouraged by this study. Women in tech and other STEM fields are some of the most intelligent, driven, and successful people I know. Even when they face daunting obstacles. If anything this study gives validation and motivation to the need to change the way women in STEM are treated. Remember: It isn’t just you. Other people go through this too. And it doesn’t have to be this way.
To learn more check out my episode on gender bias in STEM fields. 

You keep doin’ you, STEM ladies. We need you. 

What It Means When Women in Tech Are Told They’re ‘Too Abrasive’ (Hint: It’s Got Something To Do With Sexism) 

In a recent study by linguist and startup CEO Kieran Snyder, she examined the kind of feedback men and women receive at tech companies. Snyder asked men and women in the tech industry to send her their performance reviews. She received 248 reviews from 105 men and 75 women.

This is what she found: men and women receive different kinds of feedback. Women’s personalities were criticized much more frequently in performance reviews than men’s. Men were criticized for job performance, while women were criticized for not just their work output but for being ”abrasive" or having "the wrong tone". The results are so shocking, they seem skewed. 

Men received comments like “There were a few cases where it would have been extremely helpful if you had gone deeper into the details to help move an area forward.”

While women received comments like “Your peers sometimes feel that you don’t leave them enough room. Sometimes you need to step back to let others shine.”

Words like bossy, abrasive, strident, and aggressive are used to describe women’s behaviors when they lead; words like emotional and irrational describe their behaviors when they object. All of these words show up at least twice in the women’s review text I reviewed, some much more often. Abrasive alone is used 17 times to describe 13 different women. Among these words, only aggressive shows up in men’s reviews at all. It shows up three times, twice with an exhortation to be more of it.

This data validates women’s experience in STEM fields. They are stuck between a rock and hard place. Sheryl Sandberg tells them to Lean In, to speak up, and to be aggressive. While their peers and managers tell them to lean back, let others shine, and to be a little quieter. 

This is just one example of how the culture in STEM fields turns women away. While other factors keep the pipeline leaky, company culture plays a huge role. Women should be encourage to speak up, to be leaders. They should not turned down when they act like one.  It seems some tech companies have a long way to go to eliminate gender bias. 

And please ladies, don’t be discouraged by this study. Women in tech and other STEM fields are some of the most intelligent, driven, and successful people I know. Even when they face daunting obstacles. If anything this study gives validation and motivation to the need to change the way women in STEM are treated. Remember: It isn’t just you. Other people go through this too. And it doesn’t have to be this way.

To learn more check out my episode on gender bias in STEM fields. 

You keep doin’ you, STEM ladies. We need you. 

pbsdigitalstudios:

In today’s episode of #FrankensteinMD, Victoria and Iggy test sleep deprivation. 

arrowsforpens:

thejunglenook:

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully EffectOne of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.
— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

Actual conversation in my lab:Male coworker: “Why is everyone so obsessed with Scully?She’s not *that special*. Why aren’t they talking about other female scientists in the media?”Me:
*I know there is Bones and The Big Bang Theory, but how about some media featuring women in STEM that aren’t defined by their romantic relationships?

Let’s not bring up The Big Bang Theory as an example of feminist anything, because it isn’t. 

Oh hey! They do exist!


And I discuss my top five favorite fictional female scientists in my latest episode! 

arrowsforpens:

thejunglenook:

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully Effect

One of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.

Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.

The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.

— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

Actual conversation in my lab:
Male coworker: “Why is everyone so obsessed with Scully?She’s not *that special*. Why aren’t they talking about other female scientists in the media?”
Me:


*I know there is Bones and The Big Bang Theory, but how about some media featuring women in STEM that aren’t defined by their romantic relationships?

Let’s not bring up The Big Bang Theory as an example of feminist anything, because it isn’t. 

Oh hey! They do exist!

And I discuss my top five favorite fictional female scientists in my latest episode

(via hufflepenguin)

Representation Matters: Doc McStuffins
As you know, I am such a fan of media representation for women in STEM, but I haven’t given fair credit to the amazing Doc McStuffins! I feel like I’ve been living under a rock, but this little girl is absolutely perfect. She’s the daughter of a doctor and takes the things she learns from her mom and applies them to her own practice, Her toy practice! She’s smart, curious and according to show creator Chris Nee, she’s also a “strong, assertive character who’s going places in life”. In one episode she was struggling with a diagnosis for one of her patients, but that didn’t get her down. “I won’t give up, until I figure it out!” she cried! She is just the role model pre-school kids deserve.
While she’s teaching kids about health and hygiene, she also making a huge impact. Doc McStuffins is a top rated-program for the 2-5 age group. Little boys and girls love her; merchandise of the show garnered more than $500 million in sales last year. I can’t go to a restaurant or a grocery store anymore without seeming some kid toting her doll around. She’s everywhere!
While she’s awesome and adorable, most importantly she’s a great role model for young girls, especially for girls of color. There is a disproportionately low number of women in STEM, but there’s an even less women of color in STEM fields. Women of color make up about 7% of employed scientists and only 1.9% of the nation’s doctors.
“It’s so powerful to show representation of somebody who’s not usually on TV”, show creator Chris Nee spoke of this importance in a recent interview with MSNBC. Representation matters. Women, especially young people, need to see themselves in the characters they see. It gives them to the chance to say “I could do that, I could be that”. Even Disney executives admit the power media has on the way people, especially kids, see the world. So for a character like Doc McStuffins, a little girl of color who is interested in STEM, to have all the force of the Disney brand behind her, is something to truly celebrate!  

Representation Matters: Doc McStuffins

As you know, I am such a fan of media representation for women in STEM, but I haven’t given fair credit to the amazing Doc McStuffins! I feel like I’ve been living under a rock, but this little girl is absolutely perfect. She’s the daughter of a doctor and takes the things she learns from her mom and applies them to her own practice, Her toy practice! She’s smart, curious and according to show creator Chris Nee, she’s also a “strong, assertive character who’s going places in life”. In one episode she was struggling with a diagnosis for one of her patients, but that didn’t get her down. “I won’t give up, until I figure it out!” she cried! She is just the role model pre-school kids deserve.

While she’s teaching kids about health and hygiene, she also making a huge impact. Doc McStuffins is a top rated-program for the 2-5 age group. Little boys and girls love her; merchandise of the show garnered more than $500 million in sales last year. I can’t go to a restaurant or a grocery store anymore without seeming some kid toting her doll around. She’s everywhere!

While she’s awesome and adorable, most importantly she’s a great role model for young girls, especially for girls of color. There is a disproportionately low number of women in STEM, but there’s an even less women of color in STEM fields. Women of color make up about 7% of employed scientists and only 1.9% of the nation’s doctors.

“It’s so powerful to show representation of somebody who’s not usually on TV”, show creator Chris Nee spoke of this importance in a recent interview with MSNBC. Representation matters. Women, especially young people, need to see themselves in the characters they see. It gives them to the chance to say “I could do that, I could be that”. Even Disney executives admit the power media has on the way people, especially kids, see the world. So for a character like Doc McStuffins, a little girl of color who is interested in STEM, to have all the force of the Disney brand behind her, is something to truly celebrate!  

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