Ohio Lawmakers Propose Cutting The Scientific Process Out of Education
While the battle of science standards isn’t new in the halls of government, this one hits close to home (As a former Ohioan). A bill is currently under consideration that would change the Common Core standards. In particular, the wording of this bill seeks to limit the way that science is taught. The idea is to eliminate “political… interpretation of scientific facts”, but in actuality it cuts out critical thinking. 
Memorizing facts is a crucial component of any scientific education but it isn’t enough. Understanding the scientific process builds a foundation on critical thinking. It becomes a way of looking at the world. It helps people assess the validity of information. It isn’t about “interpreting” facts, it’s about processing evidence. More importantly, it’s not just about finding answers, it’s also about knowing how to ask questions. And asking questions, is just so science. 
Photo credit: @ AlbertHerring

Ohio Lawmakers Propose Cutting The Scientific Process Out of Education

While the battle of science standards isn’t new in the halls of government, this one hits close to home (As a former Ohioan). A bill is currently under consideration that would change the Common Core standards. In particular, the wording of this bill seeks to limit the way that science is taught. The idea is to eliminate “political… interpretation of scientific facts”, but in actuality it cuts out critical thinking. 

Memorizing facts is a crucial component of any scientific education but it isn’t enough. Understanding the scientific process builds a foundation on critical thinking. It becomes a way of looking at the world. It helps people assess the validity of information. It isn’t about “interpreting” facts, it’s about processing evidence. More importantly, it’s not just about finding answers, it’s also about knowing how to ask questions. And asking questions, is just so science. 

Photo credit: @ AlbertHerring

"I love science, and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awed by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and reinvigorate it."

— Robert M. Sapolsky (via pridejoyetc)

(Source: utcjonesobservatory, via asapscience)

asapscience:

ohscience:

I’m an artist with a molecular biology degree from the University of Washington, and I’ve been working on making science infographics for several months now. 
This week I made an animated identification chart of North American butterflies. You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)

This rules! 

asapscience:

ohscience:

I’m an artist with a molecular biology degree from the University of Washington, and I’ve been working on making science infographics for several months now. 

This week I made an animated identification chart of North American butterflies. You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)

This rules! 

climateadaptation:

Guys, seriously. Come meet Jenny Frankel-Reed, Senior Climate Adaptation Specialist with USAID’s Global Climate Change Office. 
She. Is. AWESOME!!!
I co-manage a climate adaptation contract with her office, and I can say she is one of the best people I’ve worked with in a long time. She manages a technical project called SERVIR with NASA, USAID, and several partners around the world.

SERVIR—the Regional Visualization and Monitoring System—helps government officials, managers, scientists, researchers, students, and the general public make decisions by providing Earth observations and predictive models based on data from orbiting satellites.
The SERVIR system helps nations in Mesoamerica, Africa, and the Himalayan regions cope with eight areas of societal benefit identified by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO): disasters, ecosystems, biodiversity, weather, water, climate, health, and agriculture. Via

I think she’s a great inspiration for young women professionals in science!! You HAVE TO COME SEE HER!
Do you want to hear about what it’s like to work at USAID?
Are you interested in how the U.S. government promotes climate adaptation around the world??! Of course you do!
Interested in making connections in the climate change field?
Come meet Jenny for a chat and some drinks August 28th. I’ll be there, too!
Details: 

A Chat with USAID/GCC Jenny Frankely-Reed. 
BAR LOUIE (CHINATOWN METRO) Washington, DC AUG 28 7 P.M.
HOSTS ENVIRO-RUN:
August 28: 7 p.m. – Bar Louie, 701 7th St. NW, Washington DC. (IMPORTANT! Bar Louie is in the mall next to the Chinatown Metro. Go through the white doors on the northwest entrance off 7th Street, by the food carts.)
There will be a place to store bags while envirorunners are on the fun run. Meet inside the event room (Upon entering, turn left and then turn right when you see the back bar. We will be through the big, wooden door along the back wall.)  7 p.m.
Photo op: We welcome you to wear your best enviro shirt + swag and share #envirorun photos on Twitter (@envirorun) and Facebook (Envirorun). Prizes go to the top tweeters!
Speaker bio: Jenny Frankel-Reed is a Senior Climate Change Specialist and Coordinator of the SERVIR Program with USAID’s Climate Change Office, where she has provided technical support to programs in 20 countries and regions across Asia, Africa, and Latin America and coordinated USAID’s flagship science and technology partnership with NASA (SERVIR). 
Ms. Frankel-Reed has worked on the vulnerability and adaptation dimensions of climate change for more than 10 years, including vulnerability assessment, remote sensing applications, climate services, monitoring and evaluation, international climate financing, and training. 
Prior to joining USAID in 2010, she served as Technical Advisor for a German International Cooperation (GIZ) project based in India, was an Adaptation Advisor with the Environment and Energy Group of the United Nations Development Program, and worked as a Climate Change Consultant to the Global Environment Facility. Ms. Frankel-Reed has forest and human ecology research experience in the Brazilian Amazon and Pacific Northwest of the U.S., and holds a Masters from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and Bachelors from Willamette University.

If you’re in DC August 28, please please come see her speak on USAID’s climate programs across dozens of countries.
She’s a young professional operating at a very high-level under Obama’s government. Come see her August 28th. It’s a small crowd, intimate setting, and the atmosphere is very casual! 

I really wish I was in DC again! 

climateadaptation:

Guys, seriously. Come meet Jenny Frankel-Reed, Senior Climate Adaptation Specialist with USAID’s Global Climate Change Office.

She. Is. AWESOME!!!

I co-manage a climate adaptation contract with her office, and I can say she is one of the best people I’ve worked with in a long time. She manages a technical project called SERVIR with NASA, USAID, and several partners around the world.

SERVIR—the Regional Visualization and Monitoring System—helps government officials, managers, scientists, researchers, students, and the general public make decisions by providing Earth observations and predictive models based on data from orbiting satellites.

The SERVIR system helps nations in Mesoamerica, Africa, and the Himalayan regions cope with eight areas of societal benefit identified by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO): disasters, ecosystems, biodiversity, weather, water, climate, health, and agriculture. Via

I think she’s a great inspiration for young women professionals in science!! You HAVE TO COME SEE HER!

  • Do you want to hear about what it’s like to work at USAID?
  • Are you interested in how the U.S. government promotes climate adaptation around the world??! Of course you do!
  • Interested in making connections in the climate change field?
  • Come meet Jenny for a chat and some drinks August 28th. I’ll be there, too!

Details:

A Chat with USAID/GCC Jenny Frankely-Reed.

BAR LOUIE (CHINATOWN METRO) Washington, DC AUG 28 7 P.M.

HOSTS ENVIRO-RUN:

August 28: 7 p.m. – Bar Louie, 701 7th St. NW, Washington DC. (IMPORTANT! Bar Louie is in the mall next to the Chinatown Metro. Go through the white doors on the northwest entrance off 7th Street, by the food carts.)

There will be a place to store bags while envirorunners are on the fun run. Meet inside the event room (Upon entering, turn left and then turn right when you see the back bar. We will be through the big, wooden door along the back wall.)  7 p.m.

Photo op: We welcome you to wear your best enviro shirt + swag and share #envirorun photos on Twitter (@envirorun) and Facebook (Envirorun). Prizes go to the top tweeters!

Speaker bio: Jenny Frankel-Reed is a Senior Climate Change Specialist and Coordinator of the SERVIR Program with USAID’s Climate Change Office, where she has provided technical support to programs in 20 countries and regions across Asia, Africa, and Latin America and coordinated USAID’s flagship science and technology partnership with NASA (SERVIR).

Ms. Frankel-Reed has worked on the vulnerability and adaptation dimensions of climate change for more than 10 years, including vulnerability assessment, remote sensing applications, climate services, monitoring and evaluation, international climate financing, and training.

Prior to joining USAID in 2010, she served as Technical Advisor for a German International Cooperation (GIZ) project based in India, was an Adaptation Advisor with the Environment and Energy Group of the United Nations Development Program, and worked as a Climate Change Consultant to the Global Environment Facility. Ms. Frankel-Reed has forest and human ecology research experience in the Brazilian Amazon and Pacific Northwest of the U.S., and holds a Masters from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and Bachelors from Willamette University.

If you’re in DC August 28, please please come see her speak on USAID’s climate programs across dozens of countries.

She’s a young professional operating at a very high-level under Obama’s government. Come see her August 28th. It’s a small crowd, intimate setting, and the atmosphere is very casual! 

I really wish I was in DC again! 

preppybiologist:

my ecology textbook was either written by a wildly successful person or a depressed grad student

preppybiologist:

my ecology textbook was either written by a wildly successful person or a depressed grad student

(via scientistsarepeopletoo)

rhamphotheca:

String Theory…  by Gemma Corell

rhamphotheca:

String Theory…  by Gemma Corell

(via scientistsarepeopletoo)

"

He told me to look at my hand, for a part of it came from a star that exploded too long ago to imagine. This part of me was formed from a tongue of fire that screamed through the heavens until there was our sun. and this part of me–this tiny part of me — was on the Sun when it itself exploded and whirled in a great storm until the planets came to be.

And this small part of me was then a whisper of the earth. When there was life, perhaps this part of me got lost in a fern that was crushed and covered until it was coal. And then it was a diamond millions of years later — it must have been a diamond as beautiful as the star from which it had first come.

Or perhaps this part of me became lost in a terrible beast, or became part of a huge bird that flew above the primeval swamps.

And he said this thing was so small — this part of me was so small it couldn’t be seen–but it was there from the beginning of the world.

And he called this bit of me an atom. And when he wrote the word, I fell in love with it.

Atom.

Atom.

What a beautiful word.

"

The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds

Tags: science quote

"If Janeway urged change in the field of science and encouraged even a handful of women to take to the stars, then it seems to me that her influence was considerable. As my father used to say to me, “The sky’s the limit, kid.” I got to amend that to, “Space is the limit, ladies.” And I meant it."

— "The Influence of Captain Janeway" by Kate Mulgrew (Foreward to Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture, 2010)

(Source: mulgrewsprimedirective, via scullybaby)

exchangealumni:

When we say ‘tech’, you say GIRLS! Our phenomenally talented group of 24 TechGirls from the Middle East and North Africa visited some of the coolest, most innovative people on earth last week: tumblr staff!

At tumblr headquarters, Caitlin Abber of MTV moderated a panel for their visit. As she says, “the TechGirls were super enthusiastic about asking the panelists a wide range of questions. They wanted to know about the next steps in their careers, the hardest parts of the job, and what their future tech-related aspirations are. While the panelists answers were all great, it was when the microphone was turned on the TechGirls themselves that the event became truly inspirational.” 

Read Caitlin’s entire piece about the event here

(via scientific-women)

pbsdigitalstudios:

Why can’t it be both? Join med students-turned-co-hosts Victoria Frankenstein and Iggy DeLacey for some spooky science in Frankenstein, MD.
Click HERE to watch the episodes. 

pbsdigitalstudios:

Why can’t it be both? Join med students-turned-co-hosts Victoria Frankenstein and Iggy DeLacey for some spooky science in Frankenstein, MD.

Click HERE to watch the episodes. 

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